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Thursday, 10 August 2017

On Thursday, August 10, 2017 by Hayley Reeve in    No comments

As a learner driver, getting your head around your insurance options can be a challenge. Car insurance premiums for young drivers are overwhelmingly high, due to the obvious risks associated with being a new and under-experienced driver.

When taking driving lessons, the driving school will be responsible for arranging the insurance during lessons. These costs, as well as fuel costs, are included into the cost of your lessons. However it’s always recommended that learners should also be practicing outside of their professional lessons, with the Driving Standards Agency suggesting an additional 20 hours with a suitable friend or family member before taking their test. (Whoever at home is teaching you how to drive, or accompanying you on practice drives, must have held a full UK licence for a minimum of three years, be at least 25 years old and must not be accepting money in exchange for the lessons.)

This means that you will need to be insured on any car that you drive outside of your driving lessons with a professional, qualified instructor. You need to arrange this yourself with whoever the car belongs to. Whoever is teaching you in their car, be it a parent or family friend, may decide to add you to their existing policy as a named driver. It seems like the obvious option, right? Unfortunately, these additional premiums tend to be much higher than most would expect and, in addition, may risk their no-claims bonus while not enabling you to build up your own.

If you already have your own car (lucky you!), then you will need to arrange your own car insurance while driving with a provisional licence. This gives you the opportunity to build your own no-claims bonus. Whoever is accompanying you while you’re still learning though will still need to adhere to the rules of being over the age of 25 and a full licence holder.

Many newly qualified drivers are still saving up for their own car or are simply not interested in owning their own car full-time. This usually means that the new driver will be sharing a car with a parent or other family member, with the main driver listed in the insurance policy being the one responsible for paying for all the things that come with owning a car, including car insurance and maintenance. Does it still make sense to be added to, say, your dad’s insurance policy?

For learner drivers and new drivers who want to be insured on their family car while they’re still learning or even after they’ve passed, then you should consider Learner Driver Insurance. Designed for both full and provisional licence holders between the ages of 17 and 27, the policy allows the main driver’s no-claims bonus to be safeguarded whilst the learner driver builds their own as the black box technology will only monitor the journeys of the learner driver - with no curfews! Often, sticking with the same insurer for your full insurance once you’ve passed and have a car of your own may reward you with discounts on your standard car insurance policy. This is especially helpful as the insurance for newly qualified drivers can be a little more costly than it was as a provisional licence holder, as you are no longer driving under strict supervision.

About the Author:

Hayley Reeve is the Editor at Motor Heads and has been a lover of fast cars since childhood. She now writes automotive content for a large number of motoring businesses in the UK. You can read more about Hayley here.

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